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UCLA Counseling and Psychological Center

Addiction Consult Service Training

Steven Shoptaw, PhD, Joy Chudzynski, PsyD, and Timothy Fong, MD
(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

Drs. Steven Shoptaw, Timothy Fong, and Joy Chudzynski will provide a training session for CAPS/Ashe clinicians on substance abuse screening, short and long-term treatment interventions, and the role of psychotropic medication in treating comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders.

The target audience include any UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and UCLA Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center clinical service staff working directly with students experiencing substance abuse related problems. The instructional level would be considered advanced, as it is a more in depth analysis into a particular clinical specialty (addiction medicine).

1 Continuing Education Credit

Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, 8am-9am (Steven Shoptaw, PhD)

Topic: Screening for Substance Use Disorders in the CAPS environment

1 Continuing Education Credit

Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021, 8am-9am (Joy Chudzynski, PsyD)

Topic: Brief Behavioral Interventions for Substance Use Disorders

\1 Continuing Education Credit

Thursday, Sept. 23, 2021, 8-9am (Timothy Fong, MD)

Topic: Addiction Medicines in the Student Psychological Service setting

Learning Objectives:

By the end Day 1 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Discuss local epidemiology of substance use disorders for college age youth

2. Recognize, use and score validated screeners for substance use disorders

3. Develop treatment plan guided by screening for substance use disorders

By the end Day 2 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the brief behavioral model for alcohol misuse

2. Describe the brief behavioral model for marijuana misuse

3. Use a guided approach to refer students with moderate to severe substance use disorders to higher levels of care

By the end Day 3 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Describe indications and use of medications for addictive disorders within the CAPS environment

2. List medication strategies that treat comorbid psychiatric and substance use disorders

3. Describe the importance of collaborative care for treating addictions

About the Presenters:

Steven Shoptaw, PhD, is the executive director of the Center for Behavioral and Addiction Medicine (CBAM). He is a licensed psychologist and a Professor in both the Department of Family Medicine and the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA.

Joy Chudzynski, PsyD, is a Clinical Psychologist specializing in addiction treatment and trauma. She leads the CBAM behavioral medicine program for UCLA athletes and trains residents at the UCLA Family Health Center.

Timothy Fong, MD, is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, board-certified in Addiction Psychiatry, at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. He is the director of the UCLA Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship, a one-year program that provides clinical training in the management of addictive disorders.

Therapeutic Engagement in Trauma Contexts: Supervision Essentials

Rick Williamson, PhD

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

Despite therapists’ training and experience in supporting others, they give relatively little attention to the emotional hazards of their craft. This workshop addresses the psychological toll associated with the provision of care in populations impacted by trauma and the protective role that competency-based supervision and highly-engaged clinical practice provides.

This training is geared for licensed mental health professionals to include clinical psychologists, licensed clinical supervisors, LMFT’s, LCSW’s, and Psychiatrists. The content offers an intermediate to advanced treatment of the topic of clinical supervision.

3 Continuing Education Credits

Thursday, September 9, 2021

9:00am-12:00pm

Schedule - Day 1

9:00-9:15 The Challenge and Necessity of Competent Supervision

9:15am-9:45 Trauma Awareness with Vulnerable Populations

9:45-10:45 Vicarious Traumatization & Other Hazards of Trauma Work

10:45-11:30 Allostatic Load: The Brain Science of Stress & Trauma

11:30-12:00 Recognizing Vicarious Traumatization in Supervisees, Supervisors, and Organizations

3 Continuing Education Credits

Friday, September 10, 2021

9:00am-12:00pm

Schedule - Day 2

9:00-9:30 Assessment Tools for Supervisors and Supervisees

9:30-10:30 Psychological Resilience

10:30-11:45 Protective Supervision and Practice for Trauma Contexts

11:45-12:00 Q&A

Learning Objectives:

By the end Day 1 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Identify deleterious effects of trauma work on clinicians and supervisors.

2. Discuss how competency-based supervision protects against the deleterious effects of trauma work.

3. Identify two dimensions of therapist self-care and discuss how they protect therapists.

By the end Day 2 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. List the 5 skill domains of the Components for Enhancing Clinician Engagement and Reducing Trauma approach.

2. Identify ways to address and help transform the psychological hazards in supervisees.

3. Describe ways that trauma dynamics can present in themselves and identify ways to develop capacity to provide effective supervision over time.

About the Presenter:

Rick Williamson, PhD (he/him) is a trauma psychologist serving in both the international and local contexts. He presents on how clinicians can thrive in difficult and challenging environments and shares from his clinical experience as well as from the latest research. Dr. Williamson brings a wealth of clinical and supervisory experience as well as an international perspective. A highly requested speaker and consultant, he has spent over a decade working in locations such as The Middle East, North, South, East & West Africa, East Asia, Central America, The Caribbean, as well as several US trauma contexts. Dr. Williamson serves on the board of the California Psychological Association and is Past-Chair of its Education and Training Division. Dr. Williamson specifically tailors the lessons and findings from the international field to the clinical contexts we navigate here at home in California for a multifaceted and synergistic engagement.

UC Updates on Legal and Ethical Issues Within a New Era of College Mental Health: Telehealth, Documentation, and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

Daniel O. Taube, J.D., Ph.D.

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

Meeting ethical and legal standards is foundational to providing competent mental health services. The current college mental health environment requires clinicians to understand the legal and ethical implications of providing care through telehealth, addressing oppression within health care services, and understanding how the CURES Act impacts clinical documentation. This course will give professionals an opportunity to renew and sharpen their ability to engage in knowledgeable, effective ethical and risk management decision-making, and to apply ethical and legal standards to challenges inherent in clinical work.

This training is intended for licensed mental health practitioners, medical professionals, case managers, clinic administrators, and prevention and outreach coordinators who possess training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering mental health services. Instructional level of the activity will range between introductory and intermediate level.

3 Continuing Education Credits Zoom

Tuesday, August 24, 2021

9:00am-12:00pm

Schedule - Day 1

9:00-10:00 Introduction, Purposes and structure of workshop, Improving ethical, risk management and clinical decision-making

10:00-11:00 Ethical bases in addressing oppression in health care services

11:00-12:00 Ethical bases in addressing oppression in health care services (continued), Telehealth: Remote and hybrid care and post-pandemic practice, Remaining questions and conclusion

3 Continuing Education Credits Zoom

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

9:00am-12:00pm

Schedule - Day 2

9:00-10:00 Introduction, Elements of record keeping, CURES Act/Open Notes

10:00-11:00 CURES Act/Open Notes (continued), Supervision: Ethics, risk, documentation and remote training

11:00-12:00 Update on limits to confidentiality, Review of FERPA, HIPAA and Cal CMIA and CAPS Records, Remaining questions and conclusion

Learning Objectives:

By the end Day 1 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Name three problems with and strategies to overcome cognitive/affective decision making errors.

2. Describe two elements of an ethical approach to challenging racism and oppression in behavioral health services.

3. Identify three aspects of local and distant telehealth services in a multicultural context during and after COVID-19.

By the end Day 2 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Summarize two developments in limitations on confidentiality in California.

2. Define two aspects of structuring record keeping so as to meet CURES Act requirements and foster client engagement.

About the Presenter:

Dan Taubeearned his JD/PhD from Villanova University and Hahnemann University (1985 and 1987, respectively), as a member of the Joint Psychology and Law Graduate Program. He is Professor Emeritus at the California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University, San Francisco, is currently a member of The American Insurance Trust’s Risk Management team, and regularly consults across the country with a wide range of practitioners, organizations and community agencies regarding standards of practice and ethical concerns. His areas of professional focus include ethical and legal issues in professional practice, child protection and addictions.

Transgender Care in the Higher Ed Settings

Saeromi Kim, Ph.D. with the UCLA LGBTQ Mental Health Team and UCLA Trans Wellness Team

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

Dr. Kim and the CAPS transgender care team will offer an integrated program providing mental health, medical, and first person student perspectives in working with transgender, non-binary, and gender expansive (TNBGE) students in a university setting. Presenters will address the diversity of gender identities and TNBGE people’s needs, as well as the state of the medical and mental health fields in addressing these needs. The program will increase participants’ knowledge base in the assessment and treatment of gender dysphoria, with a particular focus on cultural sensitivity in the context of multiple systemic barriers.

This training is intended for licensed mental health practitioners, medical professional, case managers, clinic administrators, and prevention and outreach coordinators who possess training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering mental health services. Instructional level of the activity will range between introductory and intermediate level.

3 Continuing Education Credits Zoom

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

8:30am-11:30am

Schedule - Day 1

8:30-8:50 History, controversies, then and now

8:50-9:10 Gender Diversity definitions, language

9:15-9:25 Break

9:25-9:50 Learning stance/process: Increasing cultural competence

9:50-10:15 Cultural competence: Intersectionality, Gender Affirming Therapy

10:15-10:35 Q&A

10:35-10:50 Break

10:50-11:20 Medical Transition and Psychiatry

11:20-11:30 Q&A

3 Continuing Education Credits Zoom

Thursday, June 24, 2021

8:30am-11:30am

Schedule - Day 2

8:30-9:00 Student Panel

9:00-9:20 Student Panel Q&A

9:20-9:35 Break

9:35-9:55 Gender Identity Group topics, group therapy goals and process

9:55-10:10 Break

10:10-10:30 Trans Wellness Team and Resources

10:30-11:00 Q&A

Learning Objectives:

By the end Day 1 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Describe gender diversity and the particular needs of TNBGE college students.

2. Identify and describe 3 main components of gender affirming environments and 3 qualities of gender affirming mental health care.

3. List 3 medical transition options available to students and discuss benefits of case management resources.

By the end Day 2 of this training, participants will be able to:

1. List 3 barriers to care for TNBGE college students.

2. Describe considerations and steps involved in writing letters of support for medical transition.

3. Discuss 3 benefits of group therapy and common TNBGE student concerns.

About the Coordinator:

Saeromi Kim(she/they) is an Assistant Clinical Director at the Counseling and Psychological Services at UCLA. She previously worked in counseling centers on the east coast, including Rhode Island College, Connecticut College, and Wellesley College.

Her work on college campuses has consistently focused on building and improving culturally responsive clinical care and community outreach to underserved populations, including first-generation college, international, API, undocumented, and LGBTQ students. She created the Trans Wellness Team at CAPS in 2016, and presented at NASPA, the National Transgender Health Summit, and at the UC wide mental health conferences on this same topic.

About the Presenters (Day 1):

JD Barton, PsyD, (he/him),is a clinical psychology fellow at UCLA Counseling and Psychological services and graduate from Pepperdine University. He completed his predoctoral internship at UCLA CAPS. His research explores techniques for implementing culturally-affirming practices within therapy and institutional settings and has developed expertise in trauma, and identity-affirming cognitive behavioral theory. He has worked in a diverse number of settings including university counseling centers, hospitals, neuropsychology clinics, and community mental health.

Jennifer Beckwith, LMFT, (she/her),received her Bachelor degree in Psychology and Gender Studies at Loyola Marymount University and her Master of Marriage and Family Therapy degree from the University of Southern California. Jennifer has extensive training and practice in working with the Trans and LGB+ population, including becoming a RISE trainer (training staff in working with the LGBTQ+ population in the foster care system), working with domestic violence in the queer community, and co-creating multiple groups and trainings on issues pertaining to the queer experience, both related and unrelated to the pandemic.

Taylor Dovala, MA, (she/her),is a Pre-Doctoral Intern at CAPS with experience delivering individual, group, and couples therapy. Her research and clinical interests merge positive psychology with interpersonal relationships to provide preventative and strengths-based couples therapy. She is also passionate about supporting the LGBTQ community and has developed and evaluated an LGBTQ-affirmative intervention for couples.

Kai Huang (they/he/ze)is an alumnus of UCLA ('21) and served on the Trans Wellness Team for three years as the Undergraduate Student Representative. They also sit on the Community Advisory Board for the UCLA Health Gender Health Program Research Collaborative. Kai worked as an Outreach Intern and also a co-founder and Co-Lead for the Advocacy Committee at the UCLA LGBTQ Campus Resource Center in addition to his leadership roles in the student organizations Transgender UCLA Pride (TransUP) and Lavender Health Alliance. Ze hopes to eventually become a physician serving trans and nonbinary community.

Guru Shabd Khalsa, LMFT, (she/her), earned her Master's degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Cal State University, Northridge. She recieved her Bachelor's degree in Psychology from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Prior to joining CAPS, Guru Shabd worked in community mental health with families, and then adults with chronic mental health diagnoses. Guru Shabd's interests and specialties include the Deaf community, Attachment and Object Relations therapy, women's issues and feminism, Mindfulness, Kink and Poly relationships.

Kate Mulligan, MA, LAC, (she/her),has been a Clinical Coordinator at the UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center since 2015. Kate received her BA in psychology from Drew University and her MA/EdS in counseling from Seton Hall University. As a Clinical Coordinator, Kate’s role is to help students minimize the impact of illness, injury, and emotional distress on their academic careers through coordination of services from campus and community resources. Kate joined the UCLA Trans Wellness interdisciplinary team in 2017 and provides case management to students who need assistance navigating medical referrals, insurance, pre surgery letters, name change documentation, financial concerns, and more. Kate presented a session called The Trans Wellness Team: Building Trans Affirming Services in College Counseling and Student Health Centers at the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) annual conference in March 2019 along with CAPS/student health colleagues and a student representative from the Trans Wellness Team.

M. Steven Sager, MD, (he/him/his),is a board-certified Child, Adolescent, Adult and Addiction Psychiatrist with a specialty in working with Transitional Age Youth. He trained at USC and UCLA. He currently works as a Psychiatrist at UCLA CAPS, the Student Counseling Center at Pepperdine University, Los Angeles LGBT Center Youth Services, Covenant House California/John Wesley Community Healthcare Institute and the Fulton Psychological Group in Calabasas. He has worked with the transgender community at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. He has served on the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry’s Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues Committee. Dr. Sager has also been a faculty member of the LGBTQ Internal Medicine Fellowship at UCLA.

Tara Tehrani, PsyD, (she/her), is a licensed clinical psychologist at the Counseling and Psychological Services at UCLA and completed her post-doctoral work at the center as well. She has previous experience in substance use treatment and co-occurring disorders as well as neuropsychological assessment evaluations. Her dissertation focused on developing a nonpathologizing, non-linear, and intersectional theoretical model of identity development for transgender Black-Americans. Her work at UCLA emphasizes the importance of understanding patients from a multicultural lens highlighting the nuances of one’s experience related to their salient identities. She has a focus of serving the LGBTQ+ community with a particular emphasis in serving transgender, non-binary, and gender expansive (TNGBE) students at UCLA. She has previous involvement in the Trans Wellness Team and co-facilitating the Gender Identity Spectrum group. She is passionate about providing affirming care to underserved communities and advocating for social justice initiatives within the field of psychology.

Jason Tomasian, LCSW, (he/him), is a licensed clinical social worker specializing in working with clients experiencing depression, anxiety, life transitions and relationship, identity and LGBTQ specific issues. Jason has extensive experience working with the LGBTQ community in community based, healthcare and college counseling settings. Prior to joining CAPS, he worked at the Los Angeles LGBT Center providing outpatient therapy. At CAPS, he is a member of the LGBTQ Mental Health Working Group, which focuses on coordinating and further developing LGBTQ affirming care for students. He is also a member of UCLA’s Trans Wellness Team, which provides interdisciplinary case consultation and aims to further enhance trans related services on campus. Jason holds weekly drop-in hours at the LGBTQ Campus Resource Center for students seeking support and resources.

Monique Vaillancourt, NP, (she/her), attended UCSD where she majored in Biology (Physiology and Neuroscience) and played collegiate basketball. She received her bachelor's and Master's in Nursing at UCLA where she specialized in Family practice and completed a Neuropsychiatric subspecialty. She joined the UCLA Arthur Ashe student health and wellness center in 2000 as a primary care clinician. She has had a longstanding commitment to the LGBTQ community and has been the head of the Ashe center gender health program for the last 5 years.

About the Presenters (Day 2):

Diana (Dee) Chappelear, PhD, (she/her), is a licensed psychologist who earned her doctorate in clinical psychology from California School of Professional Psychology, and her M.A. and B.A. in psychology, with minors in sociology and Women’s studies, from California State University, Northridge. Prior to joining CAPS, Dr. Chappelear worked extensively within a community mental health setting. Diagnostic issues addressed included; mood disorders, PTSD, anxiety, mood dysregulation, schizophrenia, substance abuse, and LGBTQ issues. For several years, Dr. Chappelear served as Didi Hirsch MHS Director of Crisis Residential Programs for the only two crisis residential programs in Los Angeles County, and is adept at crisis intervention and resolution.

Gabriel Loredo, M.Ed., (he/him), is the Community Relations and Outreach Coordinator for UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). He earned his B.A. in History from the University of California, Santa Barbara and his M.Ed in Higher Education from Loyola University Chicago. In his role at CAPS, he helps coordinate the prevention and outreach initiatives for the Counseling Center, as well as maintaining a network of community providers available for students seeking care off-campus. He serves on campus committees including UCLA Committee on LGBTQ Affairs, Trans Wellness Team, MindWell, International Student Wellness, Students with Dependents Task Force, Westside Impact Project, and Wellness on Campus.

Caitlin Merrill, MA, (she/her), is a Doctoral Intern at UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services. Her research has focused on gender and sexual minorities with a particular emphasis on the transgender population, she has facilitated multiple groups for transgender college students, and she has presented at APA on these topics as well as co-authored publications.

Sarah Segal, LCSW, (she/her/hers),completed her Master’s degree at UCLA in the Social Welfare department and has worked primarily in outpatient mental health settings around Los Angeles. Since completing her degree, Sarah has worked at UCLA Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital in a child IOP/PHP setting, AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Hollywood, and LAC+USC hospital in Boyle Heights. Her areas of interest include LGBTQ+ issues, multiculturalism, identity development, anxiety spectrum disorders (OCD, generalized anxiety, panic disorder, PTSD), depression and relational issues. As an LGBTQ+ affirming therapist at UCLA CAPS, Sarah works with clients to identify and validate one’s identities and systemic intersections to facilitate empowerment.

"A Tale of Two Quarantines": The Case for Adopting an Anti-Racist Framework in Clinical Practice

Elizabeth Hernandez, PhD & Elizabeth Chase, PhD

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

The COVID-19 pandemic and hate crimes have disproportionately impacted Latinx and Black Americans in the United States. This workshop will explore the intersecting impacts of racial trauma, health disparities, and income inequality for people of color and its clinical implications using an Anti-Racist Framework.

This training is intended for licensed practitioners who possess clinical training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering psychotherapy. Instructional level of the activity will range between introductory and intermediate level.

2 Continuing Education Credit

Wednesday, September 16th, 2020

8:00am-10:00am

Schedule:

7:55-8:00am Log on and Registration

8:00am-10:00am Presentation

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Identify ways systemic racism has resulted in the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic and recent hate crimes on People of Color, especially Black Americans.

2. Identify the three tenets of an Anti-racist framework of clinical practice.

3. Identity three ways people can commit to Anti-racism in their clinical role as Mental Health Practitioners.

About the Presenter:

Dr. Elizabeth Chaseis a staff psychologist at UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology (Alliant International University, San Diego), completed her doctoral internship at UMBC Counseling Center, and completed her post-doctoral fellowship at UCLA CAPS. Dr. Chase has worked in university counseling center, community mental health, and inpatient settings. Her primary clinical interests include multiculturalism, trauma, and depression.

Dr. Elizabeth Hernandezis a staff psychologist at UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services. She received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology and Bilingual Latino/a Mental Health Counseling Certificate from Teachers College, Columbia University and completed her doctoral internship and post-doctoral fellowship at UCLA CAPS. Dr. Hernandez has worked in university counseling center, community mental health, and outpatient and inpatient hospital settings. Her primary clinical interests include immigrant and Latinx mental health.

Child Abuse and Neglect for Mandated Reporters in the Counseling Center

Kathleen H. Lambird, Ph.D.

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

This course is designed for clinicians in a university counseling center setting to understand their roles and duties as mandated reporters of child abuse and neglect under California law(CANRA).

This training is intended for licensed practitioners who possess clinical training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering psychotherapy. Instructional level of the activity will be at the intermediate level.

2Continuing Education Credits

Wednesday, September2nd, 2020

10:00am-12:00pm

Schedule:

9:50-10:00am Log on and Registration

10:00am-12:00pm Presentation

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

1. List the steps you, as a mandated reporter, must take when you discover evidence of child abuse or neglect as part of your professional role.

2. Describe how the law defines child abuse and neglect.

3. Discuss cultural consideration in assessing and reporting abuse and neglect.

About the Presenter:

Dr. Kathleen Lambird, Ph.D.earned her doctorate in the UCLA Clinical Psychology program. She has been at the UCLA Counseling Center since 2005, first as an intern, then as a staff psychologist, and currently as Director of Quality Programs. Dr. Lambird is not a lawyer, but in her role has familiarized herself with laws applicable to mental health practice. She is active as a supervisor in the CAPS training program and as part of the Eating Disorders Team.

Mental Health and End-of-Life Care

Sodah Minty, Psy.D.

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

This training will discuss the basic differences between Palliative Care and Hospice Care. The presenter will consider the unique role of psychologists and other mental health professionals in this mode of treatment, in and outside of the hospital setting. The presenter will provide a brief overview of The End-of-Life Opinion Act in

California, and will provide an overview of Dignity Therapy, including examples of assessment questions to guide further clinician curiosity and exploration into the applicability of Dignity Therapy.

This training is intended for licensed practitioners who possess clinical training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering psychotherapy. Instructional level of the activity will range between introductory and intermediate (primarily) level.

2 Continuing Education Credits

Wednesday, August 26th, 2020

10:00am-12:00pm

Schedule

9:45-10:00am Log on and Registration

10:00am-12:00pm Presentation

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the differences between Palliative Care and Hospice Care

2. Discuss the unique role of mental health professionals within Palliative Care.

3. Analyze the role of mental health professionals within Palliative Care through a multicultural framework.

About the Presenter:

Sodah Minty, Psy.D.(Pronouns: she/her/hers) is a clinical psychologist who has worked in a variety of settings including community mental health, university counseling and hospital inpatient, outpatient and Palliative Care. She completed her doctoral internship at Johns Hopkins University Counseling Center and her post-doctoral fellowship at Princeton University’s Counseling and Psychological Services. While training on the Palliative Care Team at Ventura County Medical Center for two years, Dr. Minty spent time conducting family therapy sessions and family meetings after patients received challenging medical diagnoses. She treated Palliative Care patients in outpatient individual therapy, conducting clinical assessments of patients in the ICU, and consulting and collaborating with physicians and other health providers to support patients through emotionally taxing medical diagnoses.

Modern Group Therapy Leadership: What does it have to offer to college counseling centers?

Rita Drapkin, Ph.D.

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

Dr. Drapkin will offer an experiential workshop, presented over two-half days, about Modern Group

Leadership (MGL), via didactic lecture, demonstration groups, and Q&A. Because MGL is based more on emotional communication and connection, the training will focus on here-and-now interactions among participants and the relevance and limitations of MGL in college Counseling.

This training is intended for licensed practitioners who possess clinical training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering psychotherapy. Instructional level of the activity will range between introductory and intermediate level.

3.75 Continuing Education Credits

Tuesday, August 18, 2020

8:00am-12:00pm

Schedule - Day 1

8:00-8:15am Overview of day, introductions, and goals for the day

8:15-9:15am Didactic

9:15-9:30am Break

9:30-11:15am Demonstration and Q&A

11:15-12:00pm Applying concepts to college counseling (breakout groups)

3.75 Continuing Education Credits

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

8:00am-12:00pm

Schedule - Day 2

8:00-9:00am Didactic

9:00-9:15am Break

9:15-11:00am Demonstration and Q&A

11:00-11:45am Applying concepts to college counseling (breakout groups)

11:45-12:00pm Summary and Closing Remarks

Learning Objectives:

By the end of Day 1, participants will be able to:

1. Identify one fundamental concept of Modern group leadership.

2. Explain the use of the contract or group agreement.

3. Prepare for issues of diversity, identity, power and privilege to emerge in groups.

By the end of Day 2, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the purpose of bridging.

2. Describe applications of Modern Group Leadership to groups in college counseling centers.

About the Presenter:

Rita Drapkin, Ph.D., is a psychologist in private practice in Pittsburgh and Indiana, Pennsylvania. In 2019 she retired as a full professor from Indiana University of PA (IUP) where she was a faculty member in the Counseling Center for thirty years, coordinating the group program there for fourteen of those years. She is passionate about group therapy and for over three decades she has been a group member, leader, teacher, presenter, and supervisor. Dr. Drapkin has been active in the American Group Psychotherapy Association for more than 20 years; she is a past Co-Chair of the Special Interest Group for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Issues (SIGGLBT), and a frequent presenter on issues related to the role of group coordinator and LGBTQ-related topics. She is currently doing advanced training in group leadership at the Center for Group Studies in NYC. Dr. Drapkin is a founder and was the coordinator of IUP’s Safe Zone Program which trains interested employees and graduate students on topics of sexual orientation and gender identity.

Transdiagnostic Emotion-Focused Treatment (ETF)

Phylice Lim, Ph.D.

(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Setting:Live Zoom

Cost: Free

Program Description:

The presentation will provide an overview of EFT and demonstrate the importance of conceptualizing emotional processes as a common pathogenesis underlying various psychopathologies. Main principles and techniques of transdiagnostic EFT will be identified and illustrated through case example(s). Cross-cultural considerations and common barriers in practicing EFT will be discussed.

This training is intended for licensed practitioners who possess clinical training, knowledge, and experiences in delivering psychotherapy. Prior knowledge and/or training with emotion-focused treatment is not required. Instructional level of the activity will range between introductory and intermediate (primarily) level.

2 Continuing Education Credit

Wednesday, August 12th, 2020

10:00am-12:00pm

Schedule

9:45-10:00am Log on and Registration

10:00am-12:00pm Presentation

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the role of emotional processes in the development and persistence of psychopathologies.

2. List basic principles of transdiagnostic emotion-focused treatment.

3. List and apply common interventions of emotionalfocused treatment.

4. Assess culturally relevant factors in emotion-focused treatment.

5. Identify common barriers and discuss potential solutions in delivering emotion-focused treatment.

About the Presenter:

Phylice Lim, Ph.D.,is a staff psychologist at the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at UCLA. Dr. Lim uses she/her pronouns. She received her BA in Psychology at University of Kansas and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Northern Illinois University where she studied posttrauma mental health including attachment style, resilience, and meaning-making strategies. Subsequently, she completed an APA accredited internship at the St. Louis Psychological Internship Consortium, followed by a year-long postdoctoral assessment fellowship at the University of Missouri-St. Louis Center for Behavioral Health. Her clinical experiences span across inpatient, IOP/PHP, outpatient, forensic, and university settings.

Dr. Lim hails from Malaysia and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese, Cantonese, and Malay. As a third generation Chinese immigrant in Malaysia, a former international student and presently, an international staff in the United States, her personal and professional journey has greatly influenced her clinical and research interests, particularly the conceptualization of mental health needs and treatments across multicultural communities and a multitude of presenting concerns. Dr. Lim first became acquainted with emotion-focused treatment through a semester-long training seminar at her clinical practicum. She has subsequently devoted additional attention to learning and applying emotion-focused treatment in her clinical work. Dr. Lim’s clinical experiences reflect the burgeoning literature on affective science, which identifies dysregulated emotional processes as a common pathogenesis involved in a variety of psychopathologies.

Substance Use Disorders: Clinical Updates & Resources for Providers

Lara A. Ray, Ph.D.

Wednesday, June 24th, 2020
8:00 am - 9:30am
Zoom
1 Continuing Education Credit
(REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED)

Schedule:
8:00 - 8:30 am Log on and Registration
8:30 - 9:30 am Presentation

Cost:
Free

Program Description:
In this program we will review the latest development in substance use disorders, including vaping, cannabis use legalization, and the opioid epidemic. The training will also focus on reviewing the evidence-base for the clinical treatment of substance use disorders and provide practical resources for providers engaged in clinical practice. The target audience includes, but is not limited to, practioners with introductory-to-intermediate level of experience treating substance use disorders.

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  1. To describe the recent developments in substance use disorders, including explaining clinical issues associated with vaping of tobacco products, marijuana use in the context of legalization, and the opioid epidemic.
  2. To explain the evidence-based treatment for substance use disorders, including pharmacological and psychological interventions.
  3. To select and utilize a host of evidence-based resources for the assessment and treatment of substance use disorders.

About the Presenter:
Lara A. Ray is a professor at UCLA's Psychology Department and is a Shirley M. Hatos Term Chair in Clinical Neuropsychology at UCLA's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Dr. Ray has earned several award and distinctions in the field of addiction psychology. In 2013, she earned the Early Career Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, and was made fellow status in 2015 for the American Psychological Association Division 50, Society of Addiction Psychology. In 2013, she was also awarded the David Shakow Early Career Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Clinical Psychology by APA Division 12, Society of Clinical Psychology. In 2017, she was awarded the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology by the American Psychological Association. Dr. Ray has also been recognized for her teaching, receiving a distinguished Teaching Award in 2018 by UCLA Department of Psychology and the J. Arthur Woodward Graduate Mentor Award by UCLA Psychology Graduate Student Association in 2019. Dr. Ray has published 185 articles and 16 book chapters, and has served as editor on several journals focused on the study of addictive behaviors. Dr. Ray routinely provides instruction through distance learning, including a course on Psychology of Addiction that is taught entirely online.

  • UCLA-CAPS is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. UCLA-CAPS maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

    UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services is approved by the Board of Behavior Sciences (Provider Number PCE 2885) to sponsor continuing education for Licensed Clinical Social Workers and Marriage and Family Therapists

Multicultural Supervision: Making the Invisible Visible

Carmen Cruz Psy.D. & Frances S. Diaz Psy.D.

Friday August 16th, 2019
8:00am - 4:30pm

UCLA Faculty Center-California Room
6 Continuing Education Credits

Schedule:

8:30am-9:00am Registration & breakfast
9:00am-10:30am Part I
10:30am-10:45am Break
10:45am-12:00pm Part 2
12:00pm-1:15pm Lunch
1:15pm-2:45pm Part 3
2:45pm-3:00pm Break
3:00pm-4:45pm Part 4
4:45pm-5:00pm Sign Out

Cost:

General Attendance: $100
UCLA Faculty and Staff: $100
UCLA CAPS Staff and UCLA Students/Trainees: Free
Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided

Program Description:

The purpose of this workshop is to review aspects of competency-based clinical supervision as well as multicultural supervision models. Issues of supervisor competence will be addressed with attention focused to supervisor awareness and insight about how their own intersectional cultural identity variables & stimulus value impact supervisory alliances. Participants will also engage in self-exploration regarding how issues of power are explored or not within a supervisory relationship as well as bi-directional microaggressions in the supervision process.

This workshop is prepared for intermediate to advanced supervisors involved in supervision of graduate therapists in training, doctoral interns, post-docs and early career professionals, who work in University Counseling Centers.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify at least two ways in which one's personal cultural identity variables impact supervisory relationships
  2. Gain exposure and critique multicultural models of supervision
  3. Gain a process by which to demonstrate awareness regarding power and identity variables in the supervisory relationship
  4. Articulate and explore supervisory style of building relational safety within supervisory context

About the Presenters

Dr. Carmen Cruzis a Licensed Psychologist and Diversity/Social Justice Consultant in the Denton/Dallas/Fort Worth area. She is Associate Director and Director of Training at Texas Woman’s University Counseling Center. Additionally, she provides consultation and diversity trainings for institutions, schools, and businesses who aim to improve their perspectives and inclusion within their organizations. She is a diversity and gender specialist and enjoys working to help individuals understand people who are different than themselves. Her professional interests include teaching/training, multicultural psychology, existentialism, cultural/spiritual development, and the impact of stigma in seeking help. She goes by Cruz and uses she/her pronouns.

Dr. Frances Diazis a Bilingual Licensed Psychologist and Director of the Counseling Center at University of California Irvine. Dr. Diaz completed her undergraduate studies in Psychology and Social Behavior at UCI and received her masters and doctoral degrees in Psychology from Pepperdine University. Dr. Diaz completed her internship at Children’s Hospital of Orange County, with a specialization in working with Spanish Speaking children and families faced with chronic medical concerns. Dr. Diaz’s commitment to social justice and providing multicultural responsive treatment to diverse communities lead her to UCI’s Counseling Center, where she has been for the past 10 years. Under her direction, UCI’s Training Program received the APA Richard M. Suinn Minority Achievement Award. Dr. Diaz’s professional interest focus on training future psychologists, working with marginalized communities, empowerment, and addressing issues of social justice. Dr. Diaz uses she/her pronouns.

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* UCLA-CAPS is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. UCLA-CAPS maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
* UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services is approved by the Board of Behavior Sciences (Provider Number PCE 2885) to sponsor continuing education for Licensed Clinical Social Workers and Marriage and Family Therapists

About the Presenters:

Dr. Carmen Cruzis a Licensed Psychologist and Diversity/Social Justice Consultant in the Denton/Dallas/Fort Worth area. She is Associate Director and Director of Training at Texas Woman’s University Counseling Center. Additionally, she provides consultation and diversity trainings for institutions, schools, and businesses who aim to improve their perspectives and inclusion within their organizations. She is a diversity and gender specialist and enjoys working to help individuals understand people who are different than themselves. Her professional interests include teaching/training, multicultural psychology, existentialism, cultural/spiritual development, and the impact of stigma in seeking help. She goes by Cruz and uses she/her pronouns.

Dr. Frances Diazis a Bilingual Licensed Psychologist and Director of the Counseling Center at University of California Irvine. Dr. Diaz completed her undergraduate studies in Psychology and Social Behavior at UCI and received her masters and doctoral degrees in Psychology from Pepperdine University. Dr. Diaz completed her internship at Children’s Hospital of Orange County, with a specialization in working with Spanish Speaking children and families faced with chronic medical concerns. Dr. Diaz’s commitment to social justice and providing multicultural responsive treatment to diverse communities lead her to UCI’s Counseling Center, where she has been for the past 10 years. Under her direction, UCI’s Training Program received the APA Richard M. Suinn Minority Achievement Award. Dr. Diaz’s professional interest focus on training future psychologists, working with marginalized communities, empowerment, and addressing issues of social justice. Dr. Diaz uses she/her pronouns.

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* UCLA-CAPS is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. UCLA-CAPS maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
* UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services is approved by the Board of Behavior Sciences (Provider Number PCE 2885) to sponsor continuing education for Licensed Clinical Social Workers and Marriage and Family Therapists

Suicide Assessment, Prevention, Intervention, and Postvention on University Campuses

Nadine J. Kaslow, Ph.D., ABPP

Friday August 28th, 2019
8:00am - 4:30pm

UCLA Faculty Center
6 Continuing Education Credits

Schedule:

8:15-9:00am Sign in and Registration; Continental Breakfast provided
9:00-12:00pm Suicide Assessment, Prevention, Intervention, and Postvention on University Campuses
12:00-1:00pm Lunch provided
1:00-4:00pm Suicide Assessment, Prevention, Intervention, and Postvention on University Campuses
4:00-4:30pm Sign out

Cost:
General Attendance: $100
UCLA Faculty and Staff: $100
UCLA CAPS Staff and UCLA Students/Trainees: Free

Click here to Register

Program Description:

Using research evidence and clinical experience, this presentation will frame the suicidal crisis on university campuses, detail strategies for conducting risk assessments and formulating risk, overview evidence-based and culturally-informed prevention and intervention strategies with suicidal students, discuss postvention strategies, and explore therapist’s reactions to working with suicidal students.

Target audience includes, but is not limited to, college counseling center staff. The instructional level of this presentation is intermediate and advanced.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the fundamentals of suicide risk assessment, risk formulation, documentation, and disposition
  2. Demonstrate competence in utilizing evidence-based and culturally-relevant strategies for preventing and treating suicidal students and offering postvention efforts following the death by suicide of a member of the university community
  3. Be attuned to their reactions to working with suicidal individuals and the university-community and families following a death by suicide and develop an approach to coping effectively with these challenging clinical and personal situations

About the Presenters:

Nadine J. Kaslow, Ph.D., ABPPis a Professor, Vice Chair for Faculty Development, and Director of the Atlanta Trauma Alliance, Emory University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Chief Psychologist, Grady Health System; and Director of Postdoctoral Residency Training, Emory University School of Medicine. In 2012, she received a Doctorate of Humane Letters from Pepperdine University. The 2014 President of the American Psychological Association (APA), she is President of the APA’s Division of Psychologists in Public Service (Division 18). Dr. Kaslow is Past President of APA’s Divisions of Clinical Psychology (12), Family Psychology (43), and Psychotherapy (29), as well as the American Board of Clinical Psychology and the American Board of Professional Psychology. She is the Former Chair and Board Member Emeritus of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC). She was the Editor of the Journal of Family Psychology from 2008-2014. Dr. Kaslow was a Primary Care Public Policy Fellow through the United States Public Health Service, a fellow of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program, and a Fellow of the Woodruff Leadership Academy. She has received numerous awards including APA’s Distinguished Contributions for Education and Training Award, an APA Presidential Citation for assisting displaced interns and postdoctoral fellows in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, APPIC’s Award for Excellence in Postdoctoral Training, a Heiser Award for her legislative advocacy efforts, the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award for inspiring her junior colleagues to develop effective programs in the community, the Grady Health Foundation’s Inspiring Mentor Award, Emory University’s Thomas Jefferson Award, and a Distinguished Member of Psi Chi – the International Honor Society in Psychology. She has received multiple federal and foundation grants and served as the Principal Investigator for the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Campus Suicide Prevention Grant awarded to Emory University. She has published over 300 articles and four books, one of which is a co-edited book entitled Advancing the science of suicidal behavior: Understanding and intervention. A member of Rosalynn Carter’s Mental Health Advisory Board, she is a nationally recognized expert in culturally-informed suicide assessment and intervention including on college and university campuses, family violence, psychology education and training and clinical supervision, and leadership development. Dr. Kaslow is the psychologist for the Atlanta Ballet and a frequent media guest.

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* UCLA-CAPS is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. UCLA-CAPS maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
* UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services is approved by the Board of Behavior Sciences (Provider Number PCE 2885) to sponsor continuing education for Licensed Clinical Social Workers and Marriage and Family Therapists

CE Cancellation Policy

If you need to cancel for any reason, you must notify us one week or more in advance of the scheduled CE date to receive a full refund. If you cancel within one week of the scheduled CE date, there is a $50 processing fee for the cancellation, which will be deducted from the refunded balance. Cancellations must be in writing, preferably by email to ceprograms@caps.ucla.edu. Please allow up to one month to process your reimbursement to the original form of payment, and two months if reimbursement is through check.

Reservations cancelled on or after the date of the CE are not eligible for a refund. Please note, that if you arrive late for the CE and miss the sign in period, you will not be eligible to receive CE credits. APA requires you to be present for the entirety of the presentation to receive credits, and you will not be eligible for a refund.

Please click here for policy and procedures on how to file a grievance.

APA Approved Sponsor

UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services maintains responsibility for this program and its content.